Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2016, Page: 8-14
Influence of Phosphorous and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate on Grain Yield of Rice at Kamashi Zone of Benshal-gul Gumuz Region, Ethiopia
Bekele Anbessa Fayisa, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Assosa Agricultural Research Centre, Western Ethiopia, Ethiopia
Getahun Dereje Welbira, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Assosa Agricultural Research Centre, Western Ethiopia, Ethiopia
Received: May 24, 2016;       Accepted: Jun. 13, 2016;       Published: Jun. 21, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.jwer.20160502.11      View  3562      Downloads  172
Abstract
The scientific information available with regards to the response of upland rice to N and P fertilizers for its optimum production on nitosols of Kamashi zone is very limited. Therefore, a field experiment was conducted on nitosols of Kamashi, western Ethiopia to study the yield and yield components response of rice and to establish the optimum N and P fertilizer levels required for improved grain yield of upland rice. Field experiments were conducted at Kamashi locations, for two years at this location, to investigate the response of rice N and P fertilization. Four levels of N (0, 46, 92, 138 kg ha-1) and four levels of P (0, 10, 20 and 30 kg ha-1) were studied in factorial combinations in a randomized complete block design with triplicates. The results revealed substantial responses of rice to the main factors of N and P fertilization on grain yield, No. of panicle/m2, No. of tiller/plant, No of tiller/m2, and plant height. Rice grain yield, No. of panicle/m2, No. of tiller/plant, No of tiller/m2, and plant height increased significantly with increasing level of P and N (P < 0.001). The effects of N by P interaction were non-significant (P ≤ 0.05) among the different yield and yield components studied except panicle length (p < 0.05) and straw yield (P < 0.01). Mean grain yield was significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced by 16.2% with the application of 10 kg P ha-1, 23.6% with application 20 kg P ha-1 and 34.6 with the application of 30 kg P ha-1 over zero-P (Table 2). High N at 138 kg ha-1 significantly (P < 0.001) increased the yield of rice by 47.2%, while 92 kg N ha-1 increased it by 36.2%, and 46 kg N ha-1 increased the yield by 32.5% compared to 0 kg N ha-1. There was no significant difference in grain yield between 46, 92 and 138 kg N ha-1. The magnitude of increase in grain yield over the control due to application of 46 N and 10 P ha-1 were 32.5% and 16.2% higher over the control respectively. The partial budget analysis also indicated economic benefit for finger millet when it is fertilized with 46 N and 10 P kg ha-1.
Keywords
Rice (Oryza Sativa L.), Fertilizers, Grain Yield, Nitrogen, Phosphorous
To cite this article
Bekele Anbessa Fayisa, Getahun Dereje Welbira, Influence of Phosphorous and Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate on Grain Yield of Rice at Kamashi Zone of Benshal-gul Gumuz Region, Ethiopia, Journal of World Economic Research. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2016, pp. 8-14. doi: 10.11648/j.jwer.20160502.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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